According to your four-year degree plan, you will be required to take different type of courses throughout your four years which include following categories of courses

  1. Habib Liberal Core Courses: These are mandatory courses of Habib Liberal Core Curriculum for all University students
  2. Core/Required Courses related to your focused degree program: These are core/mandatory courses by your degree program. They differ for each Program.
  3. Elective Courses related to your Program: These are the courses pertaining to your degree program and you need to select them from the given options.
  4. Free Electives – These are university wide open courses and you can take them as per your interest and eligibility. These do not necessarily be from your degree program.

For each program, all the above courses have been distributed in eight semesters (four year) and documented in the form of Four-year gird of your program. We will introduce this Four-year Grid to you during enrolment advising sessions.

As a starting point, you may start with your semester 1 courses. Following sections will help you learn about your semester 1 course Plan and the description of the courses.  First try to understand your semester 1 course plan and then read the description of various courses.

You can explore the full syllabi of your courses at https://syllabus.habib.edu.pk/. Identify the relevant details from the following sections about various courses in order to search them at the above link.

First Semester Course Plan for the School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (AHSS)


Following table presents the summary of courses you need to take in semester 1. In order to read the description of courses and the details of electives, see Courses Description sections

Major Total Credits Required Required Courses for  Semester 1 Requirement of Electives for Semester 1
Social Development and Policy (SDP) 17 to 18 SDP Core Course

Development and Social Change (4 credits)

Liberal Core Course

  • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)
  • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits)  OR  Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) . One of these courses will fulfill your Logical Reasoning Requirement

University Requirement (Mandatory)

  • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)

Any two of the following courses

  • One SDP lower division elective (3 credits)
  • Any university wide free elective (1-4 credits)
  • Any AHSS course other than SDP (1-4 credits)

 

Communication and Design (CND) 15 to 16 credits CND Core Courses

    • Materials and Practices (4 credits)
    • Ideation and Processes (4 credits)

Liberal Core Course

  • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)
  • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits)  OR  Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) . One of these courses will fulfill your Logical Reasoning Requirement

University Requirement (Mandatory)

  • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)
Not required in semester 1
Comparative Humanities 17 to 19 CH Core Courses

    • Critical Inquiry and the Humanities: Love and Desire (4 credits)

Liberal Core Courses

    • Introduction to Western Philosophy (3 credits)
    • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)
    • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits)  OR  Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) . One of these courses will fulfill your Logical Reasoning Requirement

    University Requirement (Mandatory)

    • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)
  • Any university wide free elective – only 1 (1 or 4 credits)

 

First Semester Course Plan for Dhanani School of Science and Engineering (DSSE)

Following table presents the summary of courses you need to take in semester 1. In order to read the description of courses and the details of electives, see Courses Description Sections

Major

 

Total Credits Required Required Courses for Semester 1 Requirement of Electives for Semester 1
Computer Science (CS) 15 to 16 CS Foundation Course

  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (3 credits)

 

CS Requirement

  • Computer Science Freshmen Seminar (1 credit)
  • Calculus I (4 credits)

Liberal Core Course

  • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)

University Requirement (Mandatory)

  • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)

 

  • One Natural Science (NS) elective (3 or 4 credits). It could be with Lab or without Lab.
  • Design Your Habib Experience (1 credit)(Take it either in semester 1 or in semester 2)

 

Electrical Engineer (EE) 16 credits Circuits and Electronics Courses

  • Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (2 credits)
  • Electric Circuits I (2 credit hour)

Math Requirement

  • Calculus I (4 credits)

Computing Requirement

  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (3 credits)

Liberal Core Requirement

  • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)

Design Requirement

  • Design Your Habib Experience (1 credit)

University Requirement

  • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)

 

 

  • Not required in semester 1

 

Computer Engineer (CE) 16 credits Circuits and Electronics Courses

  • Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (2 credits)
  • Electric Circuits I (2 credit hour)

Math Requirement

  • Calculus I (4 credits)

Computing Requirement

  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (3 credits)

Liberal Core Requirement

  • Rhetoric and Communication (4 credits)

Design Requirement

  • Design Your Habib Experience (1 credit)

University Requirement

  • First Year Fundamentals (0 credit)
  • Not required in semester 1

 

Read the Course Description of All Core/Mandatory Courses

Course Descriptions for the School of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Habib Liberal Core Courses for All AHSS Students

(Students have already been enrolled in these courses by the Registrar’s Office)

Course title: Rhetoric and Communication (CORE 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
This course will introduce students to the study of writing and the liberal arts at Habib. As the first class in the liberal core, RhetComm aims to cultivate the foundational skills and habits of mind students will need to be successful throughout the core and, ultimately, throughout their time as undergraduates at Habib. The study of rhetoric stretches back to classical Greece where it was intimately tied to the rise of the Greek city-states and early forms of democratic governance. The link between rhetoric, communication, and rigorous civic debate has been integral to a liberal arts education ever since.

The need for civic engagement, for well-reasoned debate in the public sphere, is still of course very much with us, but the study of rhetoric today covers a far wider field of expression. Argument and persuasion are not simply matters for politics and the university, but find cultural resonance in a number of symbolic forms. There is a rhetorical dimension, for instance, in pop songs, video games, memes, advertisements, jokes, graffiti, images, public monuments, photographs, films, podcasts, blogs, memos, op-eds, poems, tweets, stories, plays, and so on. Whether verbal, visual, or physical, all these forms of expression carry a certain rhetorical charge. They also imply a distinct relationship between the speaker and their audience, between a text and its context. A rhetorically informed analysis will highlight the intricacies of this complicated social relationship, and thus deepen our understanding of the powerful effects language can have on the structures that frame our everyday lives.

In their respective seminars, students will analyze a selection of texts from multiple perspectives, argue critically about plausible interpretations of those texts, and debate with each other about the pressing social issues they raise. The primary aim in doing so, and the overarching goal for RhetComm this year, is to practice and develop analytical writing skills. Students will learn to read, write, and think critically about a variety of texts, arguments, and forms of expression. They will also learn to advance a compelling line of argument by linking a series of interrelated texts using close reading and analysis. The larger goal here is not only to increase academic literacy, but to stimulate that spirit of critical inquiry which is the heart and soul of a liberal arts education.

In the first 10 weeks of this course sessions will introduce students to fundamental skills and knowledge required for producing successful academic writing: systems of documentation, proper citation practices, text incorporation, use of Turnitin and plagiarism, and sessions on database navigation and the fundamentals of research. The aim of this course is to provide students with a shared intellectual vocabulary to help them articulate some of the issues they will grapple with as their undergraduate journey begins.


Course title: Logical Problem Solving (CORE 111) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

Logic is fundamental to the way humans communicate. Our public debates and private reasoning are shaped by our intuitive sense of what is rational and what is not. Yet, that “sense” also serves to fool us more often than we would like to think.

“Logical Problem Solving” will help you understand the distinction between what seems sensible and what actually is. By learning the essential elements, the language, and the formal tools of logic, you will learn to deconstruct and analyze different types of natural language arguments. You will also learn how to how to avoid common mistakes in reasoning. Combined, these tools and learning will help you develop a better sense of truth and the ability to argue and opine rationally.

This course introduces basic methods for representing and assessing the logical form of various arguments at an undergraduate level. Students will learn to differentiate between both inductive and deductive arguments in natural language in terms of their structure and content. Further, students will learn to identify and avoid common mistakes in reasoning based on content (informal reasoning).

The majority of the course will focus on imparting formal reasoning (structure-based) skills to students. Students will study various forms of deductive arguments based on form, and learn to identify these forms in natural language arguments. Students will also learn to represent natural language statements and arguments in formal symbolic and graphic notations. They will further learn various tools to analyze the validity, truth, and soundness of deductive statements and arguments, to build a better understanding of the nature of truth and sensibility. And students will learn to identify and avoid common mistakes in reasoning based on argumentation structure (formal reasoning).


Course Title: Design your Habib Experience (PLAY 113) – 1 Credit Hour
Type of the Course: Required
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: PG

Brief Description of the Course:
This course will take you through the basics of Human-Centered Design: an approach to problem-solving that involves empathizing with people; defining problems; generating ideas; prototyping solutions; and testing to learn what works and what doesn’t. The first twelve weeks of the course will take students through the design process, practically applying key methods and mindsets to tackle problems around us at Habib. For example, this could be redesigning the university food experience, or designing a new student governance model. In the last three weeks of the course, students will apply their skills and knowledge to a more personal challenge: designing their own Habib experience.
Students will leave this course having understood how Human-Centered Design can be used for creative problem-solving. Through practice-based learning they will be able to apply core concepts, tools and methodologies to any problem faced: on an individual level; in any industry; or as a global citizen. Moreover, the Design Your Habib Experience part of this course will help students to navigate their university experience on a personal and professional level, with a lot more clarity and purpose.


Course Title: First Year Fundamentals (FYE 1011) – 0 Credit Hour
Type of the Course: Required
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: University Requirement

Brief Description of the Course:
The first year of college/university is an important milestone in a student’s academic life. Whether it’s developing effective study habits or fostering relationships with professors and peers, the first-year experience (FYE) impacts academic success and community relations. A good FYE is critical for student success and retention. It is relevant to all students irrespective of their educational background and the Major in which they are enrolled.
FYE becomes more critical in light of the issues students face while transitioning from a High School to a University. To address issues pertaining to student transition as well as to provide a strong foundation to the students for their success, Habib University has designed ‘HU First-Year Experience’ (HU FYE) Program in light of the general as well as very specific issues faced by the first-year students at Habib University.
First-Year Fundamentals (FYF), being part of the FYE, is one of the special programs designed to address some of the first-year challenges and improve students’ first-year experience. It will focus on three key elements
1. Knowledge and Understanding – Helping first year students to know and understand all key academic and non-academic policies and processes critical for their success at HU
2. Skills and Values – Engaging first year students to understand and refine their skills and values which play key role for their success at Habib
3. Community Building – Engaging first year students in building relationships with HU community (students, staff, faculty, alumni, leadership etc.)


Social Development and Policy Core Courses

Course title: Development and Social Change (SDP 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: SDP Required Course
Open for: SDP Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

This course provides an introduction to development and social change. It is a required course for SDP majors but can be taken as an elective for other students interested in the field. The course provides an overview of ideas, theories and concepts as well as a discussion on critical development challenges. This includes issues of urbanization; food security; migration; intersectionality and gender; as well as wars disasters and conflict. For those planning to take SDP as a major this course provides a foundation that will be further expanded on and interrogated in the next four years in the different courses you will take.

Development is one of the principal ideas of our time. The stated purpose of national and international development programs is to improve the wellbeing of people, whether through training, construction of roads and water supply schemes, or the improvement of health services, or in management of disasters such as the current pandemic. At the same time, the distribution of the benefits of development policies and projects are becoming more skewed, and the harmful effects of large-scale development projects are becoming more prominent. This situation leads us to ask what counts as development and for whom? How have modern societies sought to realize their visions of progress?

The purpose of this foundational course is to get you as students to think about these questions by introducing you to the history, theory, and the contemporary practice of development. First, we will explore the concept of ‘development’ within the broader field of social sciences and see how it works as a social category, institutional practice, and political technology. This will be followed by an analysis of the assumptions and effects of development programs and policies in specific areas of concern such as poverty, gender, health, education, and disaster preparedness.


Communication and Design Core Courses

Course title: Materials and Practices (CND 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: CND students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

Fundamental to practice in the creative art and design disciplines is the ability to see phenomenon in the real world differently, to be able to use observation as the basis for imagination and creative insight, and to materialize both observed and imaginary phenomenon into basic material and visual artifacts, or prototypes. This studio course aims to give incoming freshmen students the foundational skills, tools, and techniques in creative observation, ideation, and prototyping that they will build on in subsequent semesters in more advanced courses. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing and prototyping techniques through a range of mediums.

The course will start from basic 2D drawing and will transition after mid-semester towards technical drawing and crafting 3D models from various materials. Students will also cover foundational concepts and frameworks in working with gestalt relations, perspective, light, texture, color, framing etc., and engage with readings and important critical texts that introduce them to discourses in design around these concepts.

This course will ensure that the students have a firm grasp of core principles in creative expression through sketching, drawing and working with physical materials on aspects such as figure/ground, color theory, composition etc. The students will also develop sharper observational skills in being able to perceive real form phenomenon and abstract them into visual and material representations. They will also appreciate the importance of prototyping as a systematic process of materializing and refining ideas and will have learned to value the necessity of developing technical skills and craftsmanship working across a range of media commonly used in design prototyping.


Course title: Ideation and Processes(CND 102) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: CND students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

In this class, we will investigate and explore the creative process in order to generate ideas for art, tech and design projects and more. The course will show how different concepts, techniques, and methods can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what one ultimately creates and prototypes. Students will expand their arsenal of design and research skills, learn how to think critically about their audience, content, form, and processes, as well as, understand the importance of utilizing more than one research and design strategy. The course will introduce a number of tools and techniques through hands-on exercises and assignments to really drive home how iterative, messy and exciting the creative process can be!

This course aims for students to develop conceptual thinking skills to generate ideas and content in order to create something new, turn problems into opportunities and express one’s point of view through making. They learn to use their imagination to create something entirely new & innovative OR to reinvent an old idea into something new and improved. This learning also helps the students to start developing their research and studio practice through inquiry, experimentation and iteration. Their critical thinking skills are also enhanced that will for analysis of creative work within cultural, historical, and technological contexts.

Their collaboration skills are also put in practice in the course to teach them to effectively work in a team or group setting; and the students also develop a habit of reflecting, writing, documenting and showcasing their work.


Comparative Humanities Core Courses

Course title: Critical Inquiry and the Humanities: Love and Desire (HCI 101) – 4 credit hours
Type of course: Comparative Humanities Core Course
Open for: All Comparative Humanities Students

Brief description of the course:

This is the first course in the core sequence of the new Comparative Humanities major. The course is team-taught and consists of four units, one for each of the major concentration areas in the program: History, Literature, Philosophy and Religious Studies. Using the central organizing theme for this course, which is love and desire, we will explore how each of these disciplines frames and examines some aspect of a broad complex issue that transcends a single academic discipline. We will consider what sorts of questions historians, scholars of literature, philosophers and religious studies scholars ask about love and desire, and how they analyze the topic and pursue answers to the questions they ask. By bringing together these four major disciplinary fields in the humanities, you will both learn something about how each discipline works and also about how intellectual discourse crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. This facility for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary inquiry is an important outcome for this major and yields the distinctive abilities in critical thinking for which the graduates of humanities programs have long been distinguished and valued. Through this course you will also develop a deeper appreciation for differing perspectives.


Course title: Introduction to Western Philosophy (PHIL 122) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of course: Comparative Humanities Core Course
Open for: All Comparative Humanities students

Brief description of the course:

This course aims to provide a systematic introduction to the main problems of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics, as addressed in the Western philosophical tradition. It familiarises students with central debates in Western philosophy and permits them an overview of the works of some of the discipline’s most pertinent thinkers. It does so by pointing out long term traditions of Western philosophical thought as well as their implications for contemporary intellectual discourse.

This course aims to provide a systematic introduction to the main problems of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics, as addressed in the Western philosophical tradition. Students will study fundamental questions that have been significant to Western philosophy from its beginning.


Course Descriptions for Dhanani School of Science and Engineering

Habib Liberal Core Courses for All DSSE Students

Course title: Rhetoric and Communication (CORE 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All DSSE Students (CS, EE and CE)
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:

This course will introduce students to the study of writing and the liberal arts at Habib. As the first class in the liberal core, RhetComm aims to cultivate the foundational skills and habits of mind students will need to be successful throughout the core and, ultimately, throughout their time as undergraduates at Habib. The study of rhetoric stretches back to classical Greece where it was intimately tied to the rise of the Greek city-states and early forms of democratic governance. The link between rhetoric, communication, and rigorous civic debate has been integral to a liberal arts education ever since.

The need for civic engagement, for well-reasoned debate in the public sphere, is still of course very much with us, but the study of rhetoric today covers a far wider field of expression. Argument and persuasion are not simply matters for politics and the university, but find cultural resonance in a number of symbolic forms. There is a rhetorical dimension, for instance, in pop songs, video games, memes, advertisements, jokes, graffiti, images, public monuments, photographs, films, podcasts, blogs, memos, op-eds, poems, tweets, stories, plays, and so on. Whether verbal, visual, or physical, all these forms of expression carry a certain rhetorical charge. They also imply a distinct relationship between the speaker and their audience, between a text and its context. A rhetorically informed analysis will highlight the intricacies of this complicated social relationship, and thus deepen our understanding of the powerful effects language can have on the structures that frame our everyday lives.

In their respective seminars, students will analyze a selection of texts from multiple perspectives, argue critically about plausible interpretations of those texts, and debate with each other about the pressing social issues they raise. The primary aim in doing so, and the overarching goal for RhetComm this year, is to practice and develop analytical writing skills. Students will learn to read, write, and think critically about a variety of texts, arguments, and forms of expression. They will also learn to advance a compelling line of argument by linking a series of interrelated texts using close reading and analysis. The larger goal here is not only to increase academic literacy, but to stimulate that spirit of critical inquiry which is the heart and soul of a liberal arts education.

In the first 10 weeks of this course sessions will introduce students to fundamental skills and knowledge required for producing successful academic writing: systems of documentation, proper citation practices, text incorporation, use of Turnitin and plagiarism, and sessions on database navigation and the fundamentals of research. The aim of this course is to provide students with a shared intellectual vocabulary to help them articulate some of the issues they will grapple with as their undergraduate journey begins.


Course title: Programing Fundamentals (lecture & lab) (CS 101/CS101L) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course, , CS Foundation Course and Computing Course
Open for: All students – Mandatory for all DSSE students of CS, EE and CE
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

Access to computing is close to being a basic human right. Computer Science (CS) studies the various aspects of computing: how computers work, how they can be programmed, how can we make faster computers and write efficient programs, what new problems can we solve with computing, and so on. This first course in CS studies the most exciting aspect: how can we create?

Computers have opened the floodgates for limitless creativity in all endeavors of life: entertainment, science, business, agriculture, finance, education, health, engineering, manufacturing, etc. But in order to make computers do what we want, we have to instruct them in their language1. There are many such languages, called programming languages, and this offering covers python.

This course aims to equip you with the skills to convert your ideas into executable code. Some of these skills are algorithmic thinking and computer programming in a high-level programming language. Ultimately, for more interesting and involved ideas, one needs to delve into mathematics, know about data structures, and reason about algorithms, all in order to write more sophisticated code. All of these are covered later in the CS curriculum. But we will see in this course that there is a lot that we can make computers do with basic creativity alone!

Computer scientists like you have made possible things that were seemingly impossible. So while it is important to know your tools, it is equally, if not more, important to be creative and to imagine. This course straddles both extremes and teaches you to bridge the gulf between free thinking creativity and low level, technical details.


Course Title: Design your Habib Experience (PLAY 113) – 1 Credit Hour
Type of the Course: Required
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: PG

Brief Description of the Course:
This course will take you through the basics of Human-Centered Design: an approach to problem-solving that involves empathizing with people; defining problems; generating ideas; prototyping solutions; and testing to learn what works and what doesn’t. The first twelve weeks of the course will take students through the design process, practically applying key methods and mindsets to tackle problems around us at Habib. For example, this could be redesigning the university food experience, or designing a new student governance model. In the last three weeks of the course, students will apply their skills and knowledge to a more personal challenge: designing their own Habib experience.
Students will leave this course having understood how Human-Centered Design can be used for creative problem-solving. Through practice-based learning they will be able to apply core concepts, tools and methodologies to any problem faced: on an individual level; in any industry; or as a global citizen. Moreover, the Design Your Habib Experience part of this course will help students to navigate their university experience on a personal and professional level, with a lot more clarity and purpose.


Course Title: First Year Fundamentals (FYE 1011) – 0 Credit Hour
Type of the Course: Required
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: University Requirement

Brief Description of the Course:
The first year of college/university is an important milestone in a student’s academic life. Whether it’s developing effective study habits or fostering relationships with professors and peers, the first-year experience (FYE) impacts academic success and community relations. A good FYE is critical for student success and retention. It is relevant to all students irrespective of their educational background and the Major in which they are enrolled.
FYE becomes more critical in light of the issues students face while transitioning from a High School to a University. To address issues pertaining to student transition as well as to provide a strong foundation to the students for their success, Habib University has designed ‘HU First-Year Experience’ (HU FYE) Program in light of the general as well as very specific issues faced by the first-year students at Habib University.
First-Year Fundamentals (FYF), being part of the FYE, is one of the special programs designed to address some of the first-year challenges and improve students’ first-year experience. It will focus on three key elements
1. Knowledge and Understanding – Helping first year students to know and understand all key academic and non-academic policies and processes critical for their success at HU
2. Skills and Values – Engaging first year students to understand and refine their skills and values which play key role for their success at Habib
3. Community Building – Engaging first year students in building relationships with HU community (students, staff, faculty, alumni, leadership etc.)


Course title: Calculus I (Math 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: DSSE Required Math Course
Open for: All DSSE Students (CS, EE and CE)
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:

The course covers important pre-requisite content related to functions, their behavior, and multiple contexts for which they serve as an important modelling tool. This course lays the foundations for students to think visually, symbolically and numerically on the two overarching concepts of Differentiation and Integration. The course seeks to pave the way for students to develop the necessary computational and analytical skills (both in context and abstract terms) required in higher mathematics courses.


Course title: Computer Science Freshmen Seminar (CS 100) – 1 Credit Hour
Type of course: Computer Science Core Course
Open for: All Computer Science Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

Computer Science is a rich field. Rooted in mathematics and logic, it is intellectually stimulating and its applications continue to enable the realization of diverse ideas that touch our lives in a multitude of ways. This seminar provides a broad overview of the theory and practice of Computer Science through a series of weekly seminars by researchers and practitioners.

After this seminar, students will have a good overview of the field of Computer Science and its applications in different spheres of life. The seminar will also introduce them to various subfields of Computer Science. The seminar will also provide them a preliminary training for reading, writing and presentations that would be integral part of subsequent courses that they will take.

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Course title: Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (EE 102/CE 102 ) – 2 Credit Hours
Type of course: Electrical, and Computer Engineering Core Course
Open for: All Electrical, and Computer Engineering students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:

Through a series of hands-on projects, this course aims to expose the students, having little or no prior exposure, to the fascinating world of electrical and computer engineering. We’re surrounded by creations of electrical and computer engineers in our daily lives. These range from fans, cars, clocks, phones, cameras to power grids and communication networks. If one were to open any of these devices, they would not only find electronics inside but in most cases some kind of processor as well to add the power of computing to these devices. Our goal in this class is exactly to open up some of these devices, at times literally but most of times figuratively, to gain an understanding of how they function. As such, students will spend some time on theoretical analysis of circuits and practice those skills on homework assignments. But most of their time will be spent in the lab, constructing and debugging electronic systems identified for them.

The experiential learning model allows the students to build exciting ECE systems on their own in their first semester, exposing them to the fun and rewarding aspects of engineering. The course not only presents a comprehensive picture of EE and CE curricula at Habib University, but also highlights the scope of ECE globally thus equipping the students (any student, not just EE or CE) for their own personal voyage into Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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Course title: Electric Circuit I (EE 112 and CE 112 ) – 2 Credit Hours
Type of course: Electrical, and Computer Engineering Core Course
Open for: All Electrical, and Computer Engineering students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Electric Circuit I is a course designed for first semester students of Dhanani School of Science & Engineering. In this course, students will learn about the main components of electric circuits, measuring entities, laws and techniques to analyze different types of electric circuits.

Course Description of All Elective Courses of DSSE and AHSS


Course Title: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANT 101) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective
Open for : Only for Social Development and Policy students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: SDP

Brief Description of the Course:
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology introduces students to the intricacies of human cultures and highlights the interlacing of cultural patterns with the forces of modernity. For instance, how do gift-exchange practices of local communities help us understand the politics of international aid? How do rituals of magic explain the commodity fetishism of capitalism? Does understanding cultural theories of identity help us rethink notions of the modern developmental subject? Does tribal social organization undergird or conflict with the modern nation-state? Addressing questions like these will provoke students to think critically of culture as an important tool for making sense of patterns of contemporary social development.


Course Title: Urban & Rural Sociology (SOC 225) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective
Open for: Only for Social Development and Policy students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: SDP

Brief Description of the Course:
This course introduces students to sociological research on urban & rural issues. We will pay particular attention to the multiple dimensions of those issues (cultural, economic, political, social), to the ways in which contextual scales – from the local to the global – interlock, and to the variety of approaches to empirical analysis (macro & micro, objective & subjective, quantitative & qualitative). We will examine recent research on Karachi, rural Pakistan, issues across the Global South, and on the United States.


Course Title: Breathing Bansuri (MUS 111) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: CH Elective, Free Elective, Course to fulfill Creative Practice Requirement
Open for: Social Development and Policy and Comparative Humanities students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: CH

Brief Description of the Course:
This course should interest all students interested in music, particularly music from other cultures of the world. It is conceived as a CLS elective which caters to those wishing to fulfill elective requirements in the AHSS and are interested in improving their listening skills as well as thinking about how to listen to and understand music from other cultures and contexts.

Every known human culture has created a flute, and the Bansuri is the primary flute of South Asia. Bans means Bamboo and Sur connotes melody. Made by burning holes in a hollow bamboo, it is one of the simplest instruments in the world, yet capable of producing the most complex sonic nuances and ornamentations. This melodic bamboo has moved us with its sounds and stories at least since 200 BC; which is when it is first mentioned in the Nāṭya Śāstra, an ancient Sanskrit treatise on the performing arts. Widely known as the divine instrument of Lord Krishna, it is found all over South Asia and has existed in its unchanged form for at least 2000 years, most likely more. Originally considered as a ‘folk’ instrument, the Bansuri was reborn in the 20th century through the experimental innovations of the great Pt. Pannalal Gosh, who created a larger sized flute and made it possible to render the complex ornamentations that are central to Hindustani Shastriya Sangeet, or South Asian ‘classical’ music. Through the efforts and explorations of contemporary artists such as Pt. Hariprasad Chaurasia and various others, the Bansuri is now known, loved, and appreciated all over the world with a rapidly growing interest in its learning. In the Pakistani context too, it is respected and adored in every corner of the country; yet opportunities to learn, or even acquire the instrument have become extremely rare in recent times. The Bansuri scarcely needs us to continue its enduring legacy, but neglecting it would be our own misfortune.
This course offers students the opportunity to embark on what will hopefully be a lifelong relationship with the instrument and its music. Breathing in to the Bansuri, is a portal to numerous new worlds, within and without. The course aims to introduce students to the Bansuri and its music. The course will teach students the basic skills of both playing as well as listening to the instrument. Through this, it also serves as a gateway to the rich and complex knowledge world of South Asian music where students are introduced to its rudiments, theory, and aesthetics, with practical application and understanding on the instrument.


Course Title: What is World Literature: Introduction to the Study of World (LIT 104) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Free Elective; AHSS Breadth Elective
Open for: All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: CH

Brief Description of the Course:
This course is an introduction to literary study that develops students’ critical reading skills through the analysis of poetry, prose, drama, and/or film.

For this semester, the course will center around the theme of deviance. Students will focus on the ways different individuals, societies, and cultures represent deviance in literature, and how we read and interpret those forms of representation through the application of basic critical literary tools and theories. Key questions that we will cover include: Who is labelled as deviant? How are boundaries of acceptability and deviance constructed and negotiated within different narratives? What does the deviant figure represent in the modern age? How are ideas of deviance understood across various markers of identity, including gender, class, sexuality, race, and postcoloniality? Some of the authors we will read include: Nella Larsen, Ismat Chughtai, James Baldwin, Sandra Cisneros, Ursuala Le Guin, Joseph Conrad, N. K. Jemisin, Virginia Woolf, and Audre Lorde.


Course Title: World Religions (REL 122) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Free Elective, AHSS Breadth Elective
Open for: All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: CH

Brief Description of the Course:
The course is designed to fulfill two critical objectives. The first objective is to develop a sound introductory level understanding of five great world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism). Collectively, these five religions account for 6.1 billion of the world’s 7.79 billion people. Of the 1.69 billion people not covered by these five major world religions, 1.19 billion people are classified as “secular,” “nonreligious” or “agnostic/atheist.” It’s important to emphasize the word “introduction” in the title of this course. It would be easy to spend a lifetime studying each of these religions, so no one course can do more than scratch the surface.

A second objective of this course is that it is also designed to introduce you to the scholarly humanistic study of religion. What does this mean? First, let’s consider what the humanities are. They are an interrelated series of academic disciplines that explore what it means and has meant to be human across both time and geographical space. And, as we’ll discuss in greater detail in a moment, from our earliest historical records of abstract human thought, religion seems to have been universally central to human expressions of meaning.


Course Title: Sound and Subjectivity: Thinking World Music (MUS 222) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Free Elective, AHSS Breadth Elective
Open for: All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: CH

Brief Description of the Course:
Every known human culture and community has produced music or exhibited sonic practices that can be classified as ‘music’. Music is immensely meaningful and moving for the communities that it belongs to. However, the experience of listening to sound and music from cultures and contexts that are unfamiliar to us, can be both blissful and elating, as well as bizarre and alienating. The affect produced by strange sounds and foreign musical structures is determined by the subjectivities that constitute our own ways of listening. What then, is the nature of listening? How should we listen to, engage with, and understand music from other cultures, contexts, and traditions? How have disciplines like anthropology, musicology, and ethnomusicology historically addressed and understood non-western music? What are the variety of meanings- social, cultural, religious, and political- that music continues to be imbued with? What does our experience of listening to the Other tell us about ourselves? These questions form the core basis of inquiry in this course. This is a survey course of selected musical cultures and traditions of the world that is organized through an aural geography that takes the subjectivity of our listening as its point of departure.


Course Title: Thumri ki Kahani (MUS 227) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Free Elective, AHSS Breadth Elective
Open for : All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: CH

Brief Description of the Course:
Thumri is one of the popular styles of singing in South Asia. It is described as a dance song in the 17th Century treatises like Raag Darpan and Tohfat-ul-Hind. With the passage of time, the dance element faded and now it is mostly presented by way of vocalization. Thumri was patronized by Nawab Wajid Ali Shah, the King of Lucknow who ruled the state of Avadh from 1847 to 1856. Technically speaking, this genre is a pleasant blend of our classical and semi-classical music.

This course will develop a student into a good listener and performer (if having vocal ability) in accordance with his/her own capacity and aspiration. It will introduce students to the Thumri genre, tracing its foundational concepts and development into a refined form of singing. Using contemporary musical framework of Thumri singing, students will be familiarized with the architecture of Thumri performance, including its evolution, lyrical themes, flexible melodic structure, rhythmic pattern and the art of Bol Bant (lyrical allocation according to rhythmic cycles). We will remain engaged with various stylistic lineages of some of the stalwarts by decoding the musical language and understanding their unique characteristic styles.


Course Title: An Introduction to the Practice of Statistics (Math 108) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Free Elective, Quantitative Reasoning Course for CND and CH students.
Open for: All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
In the age of big data, statistical analysis forms the core of policy-making, product development and marketing, business decisions, scientific analysis, and just about every practical domain. Statistics, as a field, is concerned with quantifying uncertainty to summarize and describe patterns in reality, and to explore the causal processes leading to these patterns. Understanding how statistics are used and misused is vital for assessing and assimilating information in any field. The goal of this course is to help students understand the philosophy of inference, develop an information-based approach to defining and addressing inquiry, collect and interpret relevant data, and familiarize themselves with common statistical tools so that they can make evidence-based decisions.

Students will learn core principles and concepts in probability and statistics, using project-based learning to focus on practical application rather than theory. Students will also learn to create useful models to study data, be it financial, political, social, technical, and/or business-oriented. The course will also help students understand how data is collected, summarized, and analyzed for decision-making.

Students will be using Excel to apply statistical concepts and principles learned during lectures. The course will focus centrally on the reasoning part of “Quantitative Reasoning“, with tools to handle the quantitative portion. This course is aimed at all SSE and AHSS students, especially those who are intimidated by mathematics and numbers.


Course Title: Cell Biology and Public Health (lecture & lab) (BIO 101/BIO 101L) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: All Students – NS elective for Computer Science students, free elective for all students
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
Ever wonder how the human body works at the cellular and molecular level? Why should we get vaccinated? Why can you only accept blood of a certain type? These questions can be answered by studying the building block of living organisms known as the “cell”. What happens in those cells is directly reflected in how the human body functions. This course has been developed as a first introduction to cell biology that along with fundamentals of cell and molecular biology will cover areas in microbiology, immunology and physiology with an emphasis on understanding the everyday occurrences in the human body.

The lab component of this course is meant to be easy and fun! Learn to extract DNA, test your blood group, observe your cells under the microscope, amplify a fragment of DNA and observe it on a gel and count the number of live and dead cells in a suspension.

This course is optional and open to all. Both SSE and AHSS students are encouraged to attend as it will help them acquire an edge should they proceed to work in the health care sector. This knowledge will also help build a foundation for higher level courses in Biosciences.


Course Title: Food and Nutrition (lecture & lab) (BIO 111/BIO 111L) – 4 Cedit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: All Students – NS elective for Computer Science students/ free elective for all students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Food for thought! Thought for food! We all have heard “we are what we eat”. Let’s see if this is true, and if so, to what extent? How many of the world’s problems are due to food, and how if at all, can we use food as a solution to these problems? How can you use food to solve your problems? Let’s understand the basics of the wide range of knowledge that comes from Nutrition Sciences; let’s identify the fundamental science underlying nutritional claims; let’s critique the validity of these claims; let’s relate diet to health and disease outcomes; let’s explore if food can indeed be used as medicine. Here you will review the nutrients in foods, their functions in the human body and how you can improve your own health by choosing the foods wisely. You will examine the ways in which processed foods differ from real, whole food and the implications of food processing on health. You will learn how to read and comprehend food labels, how to debunk claims and you will start appreciating nutrition research. You will design a balanced meal plan with set calorie limits and macronutrients.

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Course Title: Introduction to Bioinformatics (BIO 115) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
Bioinformatics can loosely be defined as the intersection of Molecular and Computational Biology. Bioinformatics is an intellectually challenging field that enhances quantitative reasoning and introduces students to the “New Biology” needed in the 21st century.

Bioinformatics meets an urgent demand in Biology. We live in a world that is flooded by data and information from multiple data streams ranging from social, print, and electronic media to data directly generated by experimental scientists. How do we integrate these varied, complex, and multiple data steams? Perhaps, more importantly, how do we take advantage of the unprecedented rise in data volume to extract information that is both scientifically novel and valuable?

In this course, you will learn how bioinformatics can accelerate biological research by rapidly scanning large public data repositories and by generating informed hypotheses that can lead to actionable insights. You will learn the theoretical foundations of molecular biology and bioinformatics and gain a unique perspective on applying this knowledge to problems of global significance.


Course Title: Bioscience and Cinema: Myths and Realities (BIO 152) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
Are you interested in the art of movies? Are you interested in the science of life? Perhaps both of them. This course intends to mitigate the dichotomy between the two fields and offers an integrated experience. The underlying theme of the course is to comprehend a variety of biological concepts via a popular medium of creative expression, in this case selected films on scientific topics. The course will provide insights into a myriad of biological processes governing our world. You will appreciate the power of movies in developing an understanding of various biological phenomena. The central focus will be on the following themes: 1) Infections, 2) Human/animal experimentation and ethics, and 3) Plant biology. Within these themes, you will learn about the scientific method, evolution and survival of the fittest, ecological sustainability, genetic engineering, disease infections and immunity, plant’s defense mechanisms, plants communication, exobiology and much more. While inspecting the subject matter in these films, you will develop critical thinking and analytical reasoning, which will help develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the world around you. You will learn to express your thoughts through blogs and vlogs, and to communicate efficiently in written and verbal discussions.

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Course Title: Introduction to Biotechnology (BT 101) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
The last century has seen the development of an impressive range of new biotechnologies, largely from our ability to harness the power biology at the molecular, and even sub-molecular, levels. This course will introduce the scientific concepts and social challenges associated with cutting-edge biotechnologies in fields as diverse as medicine, genetics, agriculture, industry, food technology, and environmental management. We will explore technologies such as DNA sequencing, cloning, genetic engineering, stem cell therapies, GMO seeds, biofuels, among others. Students will learn core concepts in cellular and molecular biology in order to grasp the scientific mechanisms driving these technologies. You will also examine the ethical and social issues associated with different technologies as a way to understand the role of biotechnology in society. If you are curious to understand the fundamental components of life, explore the cellular and molecular world, or learn how the power of biology can be harnessed for the challenges facing the world today, this is the right course for you. It is an interdisciplinary course designed to expand the horizons of our offerings and illustrate the significant contribution of biotechnology to global society


Course Title: Renewable Energy: Why, What, and How? (ENER 104 and ENER 104 L) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective, Quantitative Reasoning Course
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective or QR Course
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
Our reliance on energy systems has been increasing consistently since the industrial revolution. This reliance has increased greatly with the ongoing revolutions of infotech and biotech. While multiple alternate sources of energy are being used and researched, coal, oil and gas continue to be the world’s top energy sources accounting for about 65% of global demand. This over reliance on fossil fuels has resulted in an unprecedented emission of CO2 and other greenhouse gases which has triggered the first man made geological age which can threaten the existence of all living species on earth. It is not likely that we will reduce our energy needs anytime soon which makes it critical to find alternate energy sources that can fuel our energy needs while avoiding any negative impact on our environmental ecosystems.

Through this course, we will explore why do we need renewable energy sources, what’s wrong with the current energy systems and what are the options available to us outside of regular sources of coal, oil and gas. We will study the operation of various renewable energy sources including, wind energy, solar energy, hydropower, biogas, hydrogen fuel cells and tidal energy. While using the current energy production and consumptions patterns, we will try to speculate the energy needs of Pakistan in the coming decades with a focus on energy needs by 2047. The course is supported through a lab where students will get to work with multiple renewable devices and analyze their functioning and limitations.


Course Title: Dynamics and Relativity (PHY 100) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)
Brief Description of the Course:
Classical mechanics and relativity both seems very different theories, but it is interesting
to combine both into a single course. There are many ideas common in both theories
and thinking about fundamental ideas in Newtonian dynamics can help students to really
understand the theory of relativity. Its also useful because at the end of the course students
can appreciate that Newton and Einstein both were essentially dealing with the same
problems, and where the Newtonian theory works and where it doesn’t work.

This course covers the Physics from Newton, Galileo to Einstein. We develop the mathematical foundations based on some axioms to understand Newtonian dynamics. We will also learn when and where the Newtonian physics fails, what is the Einstein special theory of relativity and what mathematical framework we need to apply the the special theory of relativity to understand the dynamics of particles moving at very high speed. The Einstein theory of special relativity also introduce a radical concept of spacetime and how it is different than space and time separately. The spacetime concept is crucial to understand the Einstein theory of Gravity.


Course Title: Introduction to Environmental Systems (ENVS 102) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective, Quantitative Reasoning Course  Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective or QR course
Pre-requisite (if any): None
Program: iSciM (Integrated Sciences and Mathematics)

Brief Description of the Course:
Environmental change as a result of human activities has emerged as the most pressing global challenge of our times, one with profound ecological, social and political implications and dire consequences. Addressing this challenge requires a rigorous understanding how natural systems operate and how human societies interact with these natural systems.

This survey course is designed to introduce students to the various environmental systems that enable life on earth and their linkages with human society. It is intended to be useful for both a broad-based introductory class on environmental science and as a useful supplement to specialist courses which wish to review the environmental systems dimensions of their areas of study. By covering a wide range of topics, review questions, case studies, and links to further resources, students will become conversant in the language and concepts of sustainability, and will be equipped for further study in sustainable management, planning, policy, economics, climate, ecology, infrastructure, and more.