According to your four-year degree plan, certain mandatory/required courses are offered in semester 01. Your complete four-year degree plan will be shared and discussed with you once you have a basic understanding of the curriculum framework and successfully enroll in courses designed for semester 01.
The following tables will help you understand the core/required courses you need to take in semester 01, as well as the elective courses you need to enroll in. Study the tables as per your selected School and Major at HU.

First Semester Course Plan for the School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (AHSS)

Major

Total credits required

Required courses for semester 1

Requirement of electives for semester 1

Social Development and Policy (SDP) 18 to 19
  • Rhetoric and Communication (a liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Development and Social Change (SDP core course) (4 credits)
  • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits) OR Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) to fulfill Formal Reasoning requirement
    (liberal core course)
  • SDP lower division elective – only 1 (3 or 4 credits)
  • Any university wide free elective – only 1 (3 or 4 credits)
Communication and Design (C&D) 15 to 16
  • Rhetoric and Communication (a liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits) OR Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) to fulfill Formal Reasoning requirement
    (liberal core course)
  • Materials and Practices (CND core course) (4 credits)
  • Ideation and Processes (CND core course) (4 credits)
  • Not recommended in semester 1
Comparative Humanities 17 to 19
  • Rhetoric and Communication (liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Western Philosophy (liberal core course) (3 credits)
  • Logical Problem Solving (4 credits) OR Programming Fundamentals (lecture +lab) (3 credits) to fulfill Formal Reasoning requirement to fulfill Formal Reasoning requirement (liberal core course)
  • Critical Inquiry and the Humanities: Love and Desire (4 credits)
  • Any university wide free elective – only 1 (3 or 4 credits)

First Semester Course Plan for Dhanani School of Science and Engineering (DSSE)

Major

Total credits required

Required courses for semester 1

Requirement of electives for semester 1

Computer Science  (CS) 15 to 16
  • Rhetoric and Communication (a liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Calculus I (4 credits)
  • Computer Science Freshmen Seminar (4 credits)
  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (4 credits)
  • One Natural Science (NS) elective (3 or 4 credits) 
Electrical Engineering (EE) 18
  • Rhetoric and Communication (a liberal core course) (3 credits)
  • Jehan-e-Urdu (liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (3 credits)
  • Calculus 1 (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (4 credits)
  • Not recommended for semester 1
Computer Engineering (CE) 19
  • Rhetoric and Communication
    (A liberal core course) (3 credits)
  • Jehan-e-Urdu
    (liberal core course) (4 credits)
  • Calculus I (4 credits)
  • Programming Fundamentals
    (lecture + lab) (3 credits)
  • Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering
    (lecture + lab) (4 credits)
  • Engineering Workshop and Design (1 credit)
  • Not recommended for semester 1

Read the Course Description of All Core/Mandatory Courses

Course Descriptions for the School of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Habib Liberal Core Courses for All AHSS Students

(Students have already been enrolled in these courses by the Registrar’s Office)

Course title: Rhetoric and Communication (CORE 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
This course will introduce students to the study of writing and the liberal arts at Habib. As the first class in the liberal core, RhetCom aims to cultivate the foundational skills and habits of mind students will need to be successful throughout the core and, ultimately, throughout their time as undergraduates at Habib. The study of rhetoric stretches back to classical Greece where it was intimately tied to the rise of the Greek city-states and early forms of democratic governance. The polis, as it was known, required all important matters of state to be decided by majority decision through popular assembly, a place where free citizens would argue and debate about legislation that would affect the lives of all in the community. This was particularly the case in Periclean Athens during the 5th century BCE, a time when rhetoric, oratory, and the ability to reason well were the life-blood of democracy. The link between rhetoric, communication, and rigorous civic debate has been integral to a liberal arts education ever since.

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Course title: Logical Problem Solving (CORE 111) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Logic is fundamental to the way humans communicate. Our public debates and private reasoning are shaped by logical principles, even though most of us would struggle to spell them out. ‘Logical Problem Solving’ will teach you the basic elements of logic and critical thinking. This course introduces basic methods for representing and assessing the logical form of various arguments at an undergraduate level. Since arguments can be inductive, deductive, or abductive, students will study the formal structure of the reasoning used in these three types of arguments. Logical skills- like good writing skills, are necessary not only to a well-rounded education but also to getting along well in one’s private and professional life. The main emphasis of the course is on the study of different perspectives on validity and truth, as found in theoretical conceptualisation and its application in abduction, communicative action, syllogism, induction, first-order logic, and other frameworks. Logic – that seems to be a prominent activity in education and professional development is not merely a skill but also an academic discipline that enables students to use their innate capacity of thinking and reasoning. The complexity of the present time creates a paralysis of analysis, which one can get rid of through logical skills. This course fulfils the formal reasoning requirement in the liberal core curriculum.


Social Development and Policy Core Courses

Course title: Development and Social Change (SDP 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: SDP Required Course
Open for: SDP Students and Undecided students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
This course provides an introduction to development and social change. It is a required course for SDP majors but can be taken as an elective for other students interested in the field. The course provides an overview of ideas, theories and concepts as well as a discussion on critical development challenges. This includes issues of urbanization; food security; migration; intersectionality and gender; as well as wars disasters and conflict. For those planning to take SDP as a major this course provides a foundation that will be further expanded on and interrogated in the next four years in the different courses you will take.


Communication and Design Core Courses

Course title: Materials and Practices (CND 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: AHSS specially for C&D and CH
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Fundamental to practice in the creative art and design disciplines is the ability to see phenomenon in the real world differently, to be able to use observation as the basis for imagination and creative insight, and to materialize both observed and imaginary phenomenon into basic material and visual artifacts, or prototypes. This studio course aims to give incoming freshmen students the foundational skills, tools, and techniques in creative observation, ideation, and prototyping that they will build on in subsequent semesters in more advanced courses. Students will be introduced to a range of drawing and prototyping techniques through a range of mediums. The course will start from basic 2D drawing and will transition after mid-semester towards technical drawing and crafting 3D models from various materials. Students will also cover foundational concepts and frameworks in working with gestalt relations, perspective, light, texture, color, framing etc., and engage with readings and important critical texts that introduce them to discourses in design around these concepts.


Course title: Ideation and Processes(CND 102) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: AHSS specially for C&D and CH
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
In this class, we will investigate and explore the creative process in order to generate ideas for art, tech and design projects and more. The course will show how different concepts, techniques, and methods can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what one ultimately creates and prototypes. Students will expand their arsenal of design and research skills, learn how to think critically about their audience, content, form, and processes, as well as, understand the importance of utilizing more than one research and design strategy. The course will introduce a number of tools and techniques through hands-on exercises and assignments to really drive home how iterative, messy and exciting the creative process can be!


Comparative Humanities Core Courses

Course title:Critical Inquiry and the Humanities: Love and Desire (HCI 101) – 4 credit hours
Type of course:Comparative Humanities Core Course
Open for:All Comparative Humanities Students

Brief description of the course:
This is the first course in the core sequence of the new Comparative Humanities major. The course is team-taught and consists of four units, one for each of the major concentration areas in the program: History, Literature, Philosophy and Religious Studies. Using the central organizing theme for this course, which is love and desire, we will explore how each of these disciplines frames and examines some aspect of a broad complex issue that transcends a single academic discipline. We will consider what sorts of questions historians, scholars of literature, philosophers and religious studies scholars ask about love and desire, and how they analyze the topic and pursue answers to the questions they ask. By bringing together these four major disciplinary fields in the humanities, you will both learn something about how each discipline works and also about how intellectual discourse crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. This facility for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary inquiry is an important outcome for this major and yields the distinctive abilities in critical thinking for which the graduates of humanities programs have long been distinguished and valued. Through this course you will also develop a deeper appreciation for differing perspectives.


Course title: Introduction to Western Philosophy (PHIL 122) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of course:Comparative Humanities Core Course
Open for:All Comparative Humanities students

Brief description of the course:
This course aims to provide a systematic introduction to the main problems of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics, as addressed in the Western philosophical tradition. It familiarises students with central debates in Western philosophy and permits them an overview of the works of some of the discipline’s most pertinent thinkers. It does so by pointing out long term traditions of Western philosophical thought as well as their implications for contemporary intellectual discourse. It engages with several important issues concerning the nature of knowledge, truth, self, reality, consciousness, morality, language, and God. Along with reading texts by classic figures such as Plato, Descartes, Hume, and Kant, students will also get to study modern and contemporary thinkers such as Simone de Beauvoir, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Edmund Husserl, Hannah Arendt, Martha Nussbaum, and Derrida. Students will learn to engage with various philosophical issues critically, to compare them analytically, and to translate what they mean for the present. In so doing, students will acquire the critical analytical vocabulary to understand our current socio-political predicament in a reflected and philosophically-informed way.


Course Descriptions for Dhanani School of Science and Engineering

Habib Liberal Core Courses for All DSSE Students

Course title: Rhetoric and Communication (CORE 101) – 4 credit hours for Computer Science students, 3 credit hours for Electrical Engineering, and Computer Engineering students.
Type of the Course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course will introduce students to the study of writing and the liberal arts at Habib. As the first class in the liberal core, RhetCom aims to cultivate the foundational skills and habits of mind students will need to be successful throughout the core and, ultimately, throughout their time as undergraduates at Habib. The study of rhetoric stretches back to classical Greece where it was intimately tied to the rise of the Greek city-states and early forms of democratic governance. The polis, as it was known, required all important matters of state to be decided by majority decision through popular assembly, a place where free citizens would argue and debate about legislation that would affect the lives of all in the community. This was particularly the case in Periclean Athens during the 5th century BCE, a time when rhetoric, oratory, and the ability to reason well were the life-blood of democracy. The link between rhetoric, communication, and rigorous civic debate has been integral to a liberal arts education ever since.

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Course title: Programing Fundamentals (lecture & lab) (CS 101/CS101L) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
The aim of Programming Fundamentals course is to teach computer programming as a means to solve problems. It introduces the basic components of problem solving: repetition, decision making, data storage and manipulation, input/output, modularity, top-down design; expertise in the corresponding constructs – variables, data types, iteration, conditionals, functions, file and console i/o, and recursion in a high level programming language.


Course title: Jehan-e-Urdu (CORE 121) – 4 Credits
Type of course: Liberal Core Course
Open for: All Electrical, and Computer Engineering Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Jehan-e-Urdu is a mandatory course for all students which they have to complete during their studies at the Habib University and is offered at different times for different programs The course is designed to be pedagogically dynamic and interactive, consisting of a series of lectures, seminars and performances meant to introduce and rapidly advance students’ appreciation and knowledge of Urdu through engagement with prose and poetry texts, identified to address to the concerns of the student today with the primary intention of opening up Urdu as a living language with a rich and varied literary culture.


Mandatory Courses of Computer Science

Course title: Calculus I (Math 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: DSSE Required Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
The course covers important pre-requisite content related to functions, their behavior, and multiple contexts for which they serve as an important modelling tool. This course fulfills a foundational mathematics course requirement for the Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering and Computer Science majors. It is also a mandatory requirement for all non-DSSE students wishing to pursue a Mathematics Minor. This course lays the foundations for students to think visually, symbolically and numerically on the two overarching concepts of Differentiation and Integration. The course seeks to pave the way for students to develop the necessary computational and analytical skills (both in context and abstract terms) required in higher mathematics courses.

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Course title: Computer Science Freshmen Seminar (CS 100) – 1 Credit Hour
Type of course: Computer Science Core Course
Open for: All Computer Science Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Computer Science is a rich field. Rooted in mathematics and logic, it is intellectually stimulating and its applications continue to enable the realization of diverse ideas that touch our lives in a multitude of ways. This seminar provides a broad overview of the theory and practice of Computer Science through a series of weekly seminars by researchers and practitioners.

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Mandatory Courses for Electrical Engineering, and Computer Engineering

Course title: Calculus I (Math 101) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: DSSE Required Course
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
The course covers important pre-requisite content related to functions, their behavior, and multiple contexts for which they serve as an important modelling tool. This course fulfills a foundational mathematics course requirement for the Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering and Computer Science majors. It is also a mandatory requirement for all non-DSSE students wishing to pursue a Mathematics Minor. This course lays the foundations for students to think visually, symbolically and numerically on the two overarching concepts of Differentiation and Integration. The course seeks to pave the way for students to develop the necessary computational and analytical skills (both in context and abstract terms) required in higher mathematics courses.

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Course title: Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (lecture + lab) (EE 101/101L) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of course: Electrical, and Computer Engineering Core Course
Open for: All Electrical, and Computer Engineering students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
Through a series of hands-on projects, this course aims to expose the students, having little or no prior exposure, to the fascinating world of electrical and computer engineering. We’re surrounded by creations of electrical and computer engineers in our daily lives. These range from fans, cars, clocks, phones, cameras to power grids and communication networks. If one were to open any of these devices, they would not only find electronics inside but in most cases some kind of processor as well to add the power of computing to these devices. Our goal in this class is exactly to open up some of these devices, at times literally but most of times figuratively, to gain an understanding of how they function. As such, students will spend some time on theoretical analysis of circuits and practice those skills on homework assignments. But most of their time will be spent in the lab, constructing and debugging electronic systems listed below, during the course of which they will get to apply their acquired theoretical analysis tools.

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Course title: Engineering Workshop (ENGR 291L) – 1 Credit Hour
Type of course: Electrical, and Computer Engineering Core Course
Open for: All Computer Engineering students (for Electrical Engineering students, this course will be open in a future semester)
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief description of the course:
This course will introduce first-year engineering students to the engineering design and manufacturing processes. The manufacturing labs are designed to give students practical experience in working with various manufacturing equipment and the design lectures are planned to inculcate in the students an aptitude for “design thinking.” Learnings in both the foregoing engineering processes will help students with their design projects in the ensuing semesters. During the manufacturing lab sessions, instructor-led demonstrations will teach students about various manufacturing processes; after which, students will be required to independently complete assigned tasks. Some of the tasks will be done in teams of two to four students. Students will be required to complete a major design project to demonstrate their understanding of the design process and their manufacturing skills.

Course Description of All Elective Courses of DSSE and AHSS


Course Title: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANT 101) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective
Open for : Only for Social Development and Policy students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology introduces students to the intricacies of human cultures and highlights the interlacing of cultural patterns with the forces of modernity. For instance, how do gift-exchange practices of local communities help us understand the politics of international aid? How do rituals of magic explain the commodity fetishism of capitalism? Does understanding cultural theories of identity help us rethink notions of the modern developmental subject? Does tribal social organization undergird or conflict with the modern nation-state? Addressing questions like these will provoke students to think critically of culture as an important tool for making sense of patterns of contemporary social development.


Course Title: Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 101) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective
Open for: Only for Social Development and Policy students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course introduces students to fundamental economic concepts and theory, including demand, supply, and the formation of equilibrium prices in product and resource markets. In addition, the course offers an introduction to applied fields such as industrial organization (market structures), labor economics, unionism, international trade, and market failure. Additional topics will include market power, behavioral economics, deviations from rational behavior, alternative pricing strategies, and the role of institutions, power, and history in shaping economic behavior and performance


Course Title: Introduction to Political Science (POLI 102) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective
Open for: Only for Social Development and Policy students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course aims to introduce students to the study of politics. It seeks to provide them with the basic tools to address the theme of social development and policy from the perspective of politics. The course will first present how we are to study politics; and then it will explore social power, and how it manifests. The course will introduce key concepts of comparative politics (such as ‘state’, ‘regime’, ‘institutions’, ‘democracy’, ‘rule of law’, ‘political culture’, ‘revolution’, ‘interest groups’, etc…) which are key to understand political outcomes and dynamics in different settings and across different countries.

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Course Title: Global Histories: Military Regimes, South Asia and South America (HIST/SDP 190) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Social Development and Policy Elective, Comparative Humanities Elective
Open for: All Students – As SDP elective/CH elective/Free Elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
In line with Habib’s emphasis on the postcolonial world and on a global approach of History, the purpose of this course is to analyze and understand the history of military regimes in South Asia and South America. The main concern of this course will be to encourage students to identify a common background that led to the emergence of military regimes in both regions. The Cold War bipolarity, U.S. efforts to prevent the dissemination of left-wing regimes in the periphery, and a widespread anticommunist imaginary that transcended borders are all significant parts of this common background that will be contemplated by the readings and class discussions. Hence, rather than seeing these military regimes as sole products of local or regional politics, this course encourages us to think them as parts of a broader international picture of the Cold War in which the Third World was a stage of clashes between the United States and the Soviet Union. The course will begin with readings on how the Cold War unfolded in South Asia and South America, as well as the role played by these regions in North American foreign policy. The second module encompasses military regimes in Pakistan. We will understand the circumstances that triggered the military coups of 1958 and 1977, as well as the main aspects of these regimes. The third and last module approaches the History of military regimes in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, highlighting their differences and similarities.

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Course Title: Introduction to the History of Science and Math (HIST 122) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Comparative Humanities Primary Concentration Course
Open for: All students – CH elective/Free elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
There are many myths that prevail in the history of science and maths. Some stories celebrated as bright moments of discovery or insight are the result of the proliferation of popular myths. The theorem that bears Pythagoras’s name, Darwin’s finches, Franklin’s kite experiments: many narratives surrounding scientific and mathematical innovation have acquired mythical status around the world. But are these (hi)stories “true?” And does it matter if they are not? For much of human existence, science and mathematics were inextricably tied to the humanities, particularly history, philosophy, and religion. For this reason, it is imperative that they not be considered in isolation from, but part and parcel of, the history of human thought. As such, this course has three main goals: to provide an overview of the history of science and math; to sharpen your independence of thought; and to improve your academic writing skills. We will pay special attention to debunking myths associated with the history of science and maths. But we will also investigate the notion of discovery, and why this seemingly innocuous concept is so problematic.

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Course Title: What is World Literature: Introduction to the Study of World (LIT 104) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Comparative Humanities Primary Concentration Course, ECL Minor Course
Open for: All students- CH elective/Free elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course is an introduction to literary study that develops students’ critical reading skills through the analysis of poetry, prose, drama, and/or film. Themes of the course will focus on the ways different individuals, societies, and cultures represent themselves in literature, and how we read and interpret those forms of representation through the application of basic critical literary tools and theories


Course Title: World Religions (REL 122) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective
Open for: All students – CH elective/Free elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course offers a broad introduction to five great world religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. The course also provides an introduction to the various ways in which the study of religions proceeds.


Course Title: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism (LIT 225) 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective
Open for: All students – CH elective/Free elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course explores the major theories of reading and interpreting literature that developed throughout the twentieth century. Literary theory and criticism attempts to answer a range of questions central to the nature of literary experience. It examines the production of value and meaning in works of art, grapples with the mediating power of history and culture in framing how we understand those works, and highlights the role of tropes and formal elements like imagery, metaphor, symbol, genre, and narrative in shaping how we experience texts aesthetically. Literary theory also explores questions of authorship and intertextuality, gender and agency, and language and representation. In reflecting on these questions, students will engage critically with some of the most influential theorists, schools of thought, and conceptual problems that have come to define literary studies in the past century, ranging from practical criticism to semiotics to poststructuralism. As a final project, students will undertake a theoretically informed reading of a text of their choice


Course Title: What is Philosophy (PHIL 200) 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Comparative Humanities Elective, Liberal Core Philosophical Form of Thought Course
Open for : All students – CH elective/Free elective
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Taking a comparative approach to the subject matter, this course investigates the original writings of a range of contemporary philosophers, where they have problematised and responded to the “what is philosophy?” question. The writings under consideration help us grapple with differing frameworks and conceptual lenses for understanding approaches to the complex, fundamental question of philosophy, and the process, work, purpose, and history of philosophy. This course calls for consistent focus on careful reading, writing, research, presentation assignments, and intensive class participation commitment. The philosophers whose writings we consider this semester include: Noam Chomsky , Anne Dufourmantelle, Martha Nussbaum, Jacques Derrida, Alain Badiou, Louis Althusser, Gilles Deleuze, Jean Francois Lyotard, and Reza Negarestani.


Course Title: Introduction to Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (lecture & lab) (BIO 104) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science (NS) Elective, Free Elective
Open for: All Students – NS elective for Computer Science students/ free elective for all students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Understanding how nature functions is necessary in order to develop environmental protection, conservation and resource management policies that work. The goal of this course is to familiarize students to ecological and evolutionary concepts that govern natural systems, so that they are able to make informed decisions on pressing social issues in Pakistan, such as global climate change, conservation of biodiversity, human population growth and resource management. This course is divided into two sections: 1) Evolution and Adaptation, and 2) Ecology and Biodiversity. Each lecture will be accompanied by a laboratory session (3 hour) where students will discuss and explore the concepts learned during lecture.


Course Title: Cell Biology and Public Health (lecture & lab) (BIO 101/BIO 101L) – 4 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: All Students – NS elective for Computer Science students/ free elective for all students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Provides an introduction to cellular and molecular biology and builds its connection with human biological processes, and public health concerns; will also focus on communication surrounding complex biological concepts, and the role of design in translating that for a non-scientific audience. Topics include: Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, structure and function of cellular organelles, cells 3tissues and organ systems, movement across cell membranes, cellular reproduction, DNA replication, transcription and translation, Mendelian genetics, blood groups, introduction to the immune system and vaccines, dengue viral infection, cancer development, case studies in public health, and the role of communication in science. This optional, interdisciplinary, free elective plus NS elective is open to AHSS and SSE students.


Course Title: Food and Nutrition (lecture & lab) (BIO 111/BIO 111L) – 4 Cedit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: All Students – NS elective for Computer Science students/ free elective for all students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Food for thought! Thought for food! We all have heard “we are what we eat”. Let’s see if this is true, and if so, to what extent? How many of the world’s problems are due to food, and how if at all, can we use food as a solution to these problems? How can you use food to solve your problems? Let’s understand the basics of the wide range of knowledge that comes from Nutrition Sciences; let’s identify the fundamental science underlying nutritional claims; let’s critique the validity of these claims; let’s relate diet to health and disease outcomes; let’s explore if food can indeed be used as medicine. Here you will review the nutrients in foods, their functions in the human body and how you can improve your own health by choosing the foods wisely. You will examine the ways in which processed foods differ from real, whole food and the implications of food processing on health. You will learn how to read and comprehend food labels, how to debunk claims and you will start appreciating nutrition research. You will design a balanced meal plan with set calorie limits and macronutrients.

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Course Title: Introduction to Nano-Science (PHY 104) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Natural Science Elective, Free Elective
Open for: Computer Science students as a Natural Science elective and for all other students as a Free Elective with instructor’s permission
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
This course introduces various basic concepts in the field of Nano-Science to general audience and give them an overview of the current contribution to our lives and the potential this field holds in changing the world around us in future. This course aims at developing an understanding of the history of NanoScience with introduction to various key terminologies in the field. Further take a dive in identification of structural, electrical, magnetic and physical properties of materials with specific characterization tools. And appreciate its impact in different fields: technology, health, environment, communication, transport.

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Course Title: Bioscience and Cinema: Myths and Realities (BIO 152) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Free Elective
Open for: All Students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Science helps us solve problems, and art helps us cope with the problems. This is good because science often takes a long time to solve, and in the meantime, we have to cope. So tell me, are you interested in the art of movies? Are you interested in the science of life? Perhaps both of them. This course intends to mitigate the dichotomy between the two fields and offers an integrated experience. The underlying theme of the course is to comprehend a variety of biological concepts via a popular medium of creative expression, in this case selected films on scientific topics. The course will provide insights into a myriad of biological processes governing our world. You will appreciate the power of movies in developing an understanding of various biological phenomena. The central focus will be on the following themes: 1) Infections, 2) Human/animal experimentation and ethics, and 3) Plant biology. Within these themes, you will learn about the scientific method, evolution and survival of the fittest, ecological sustainability, genetic engineering, disease infections and immunity, plant’s defense mechanisms, plants communication, exobiology and much more. While inspecting the subject matter in these films, you will develop critical thinking and analytical reasoning, which will help develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the world around you. You will learn to express your thoughts through blogs and vlogs, and to communicate efficiently in written and verbal discussions.

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Course Title: Sound and Subjectivity: Listening to the Other (MUS 222) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Free Elective
Open for : All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
Every known human culture and community has produced music or exhibited sonic practices that can be classified as ‘music’. Music is immensely meaningful and moving for the communities that it belongs to. However, the experience of listening to sound and music from cultures and contexts that are unfamiliar to us, can be both blissful and elating, as well as bizarre and alienating. The affect produced by strange sounds and foreign musical structures is determined by the subjectivities that constitute our own ways of listening. What then, is the nature of listening? How should we listen to, engage with, and understand music from other cultures, contexts, and traditions? How have disciplines like anthropology, musicology, and ethnomusicology historically addressed and understood non-western music? What are the variety of meanings- social, cultural, religious, and political- that music continues to be imbued with? What does our experience of listening to the Other tell us about ourselves? These questions form the core basis of inquiry in this course. This is a survey course of selected musical cultures and traditions of the world that is organized through an aural geography that takes the subjectivity of our listening as its point of departure.


Course Title: Music Production and Post (MUS/CND 112) – 3 Credit Hours
Type of the Course: Free Elective, Music Minor Course
Open for : All students
Pre-requisite (if any): None

Brief Description of the Course:
The purpose of this course is to empower students with the basic knowledge they will need to work with the audio component of media production among media professionals in ad agencies, broadcast channels, production houses/studios and marketing teams. One of the main factors that set apart a good production from a poor one is audio: sound design and music. The skillset that the students will have developed in this course will enable them to create basic projects and transcribe ideas that can easily be collaborated on, or transferred to a professional studio to be finished in.